Forum Posts

Simon Schofield
Aug 17, 2022
In Events and Activities
Annual General Meeting There will be lots of entertainment and music to include a Tombola and raffle Date Friday 2nd September 2022 Park View Project Volunteers will be in attendance😀
North Tyneside Disability forum  content media
4
7
14
Simon Schofield
Aug 17, 2022
In General Discussion
Facebook does not tolerate bullying and say they will remove bullying content when they become aware of it and may disable the account of anyone who bullies or attacks another. They have a set of community standards that they adhere to and it states that they will not tolerate bullying in any shape or from. You can report bullying on face the report links which appear near the content itself, as 3 dots and will give you an option to hide or report the comment or post. they will investigate and let you know their outcome. You may want to read their help pages on bullying.
Reporting bullying on social media Facebook Part 1 content media
3
4
7
Simon Schofield
Aug 03, 2022
In General Discussion
I have been trying out editing a video we made about our work with NHS Digital Project. The aim in to help those with a Learning Disability communication easier vising a variety of Digital media I hope to have the edited version available shortly.
Editing Skills Development  content media
4
14
21
Simon Schofield
Aug 02, 2022
In General Discussion
I have designed a new train for my London commuter the colour that i chosen was blue and yellow and this my favourite train to drive on tsw2 on the London commuter route with another red and blue that I also created for the London commuter route.
Simon train  content media
4
8
20
Simon Schofield
Jul 26, 2022
In General Discussion
Myself, Mart and Marion working on the Park View Project website
Volunteer Online Chums  content media
4
9
19
Simon Schofield
Jul 05, 2022
In General Discussion
Other support organisations can help with advice and training, but it's argued that limitations rescources and remit mean it often isn't practical or appropriate. The one organisation most talked about, and frequently used, is libraries. Libraries are increasingly used to help people develop digital skills and tackle the barrier of access by providing free WI-FI, computers and other technology. Over half of uk residents have a library card and around 35% of people living in the most disadvantaged areas visit their library. Trained staff, supported by volunteers, can help support digital inclusion by offering training, helping people understand the benefits of the internet and online services, and increasing their confidence in the digital world. The Library Online Centres Network found that most library stakeholders saw the demand for basic digital skills support increasing, alongside a high demand for basic digital skills support increasing, alongside a high demand from job seekers to use computers in libraries. But only half agreed their library has local authority support to deliver digital inclusion, and almost all saw a need for more library staff training to deliver it. They suggested for improving digital skills through libraries providing clear guidelines on what libraries can do, investing in digital champion training, working in partnership with more organisations, and offering more adaptive training with people. Widespread library closures across the country will have an impact on this in terms of access. But also limits on computer time, lack of privacy, and lack of appropriate help/support can mean that internet access at libraries isn't always appropriate. Libraries requiring a fixed address for members also prevents many homeless people from accessing facilities.
The role of libraries 
 content media
4
16
30
Simon Schofield
Jun 29, 2022
In General Discussion
for a long time policy and practice has seen the key barriers to digital inclusion as: The skills gap to use, or means to learn A lack of internet and/ or device access The motivation and confidence to use, understand or engage These barriers are well documented (Helsper and Van Deursen, 2017: Helsper and Reisdorf, 2012; Dutton and Blank, 20011). The reasons given for not having internet access in the household in 2017 was that they didn't need it (64%), followed by a lack of skills (20%). 2% also identified a physical or sensorial disability as a reason. other reasons include having access elsewhere, costs of equipment and privacy i security concerns. The Digital exclusion heatmap shows several contributions to digital exclusion, including social factors such as age, education and income, as well as access to fast broadband and 4G connectivity. Understanding these causal factors is key to identifying potential solutions.
What are the Barriers to Digital Inclusion  content media
4
5
17
Simon Schofield
Jun 28, 2022
In General Discussion
Access and use of digital devices and the internet are important for helping people stay in touch with friends, learn new things, and access a wide of entertainment. But it goes much further than that. Digital inclusion is important for social equality, and to ensure equal access to the many benefits the internet offers. The CEBR identifies five areas in which individuals with basic digital skills benefit: increased earnings higher employability cheaper shopping improved communication time saved through online services They also argue the benefits of basic digital skills training outweighs the costs involved, showing that the boost in tax receipts and NHS savings alone exceed the investment required. Generally, studies suggest that individuals who use the internet to create and maintain social ties expand their social capital, connectivity, social engagement, and community attachment. Digital participation can have an impact in minimising loneliness and depression among older people. Barnes finds older people who have internet access are three times less likely to be socially excluded. The widening digital participation evaluation in England showed around half of people provided with digital inclusion support felt less lonely and isolated. Accessing the internet has been found to improve social interaction in people with disabilities and is a way for people with learning disabilities to have a private life separate from carers, one where they can generally present themselves separate from their disabilities.
Digital Exclusion  content media
4
1
10
Simon Schofield
Jun 14, 2022
In General Discussion
Ambassadorial and digital leader models can be used to address digital disengagement (UWS,2017) for example, Digital Communities Wales are working on an initiative to establish a movement of Digital Companions across health Boards in wales. The will work from a basic set of principles to support engagement with the basics of technology. It will be person-centred and underpinned by social and practical principles so that 'digital' is not presented as the main driver (The Wales Centre with Co-operative Centre with Carnegie UK Trust, 2018) Their Digital Heroes programme offers intergenerational befriending where school pupils and students volunteer to support older people who are at risk of falling further behind as the use of technology continues to develop and expand.
Digital ambassador and champions  content media
4
6
20
Simon Schofield
Jun 08, 2022
In General Discussion
Motivation is often highlighted as the most significant. persistant and hardest to address barrier to inclusion (Good Things Foundation, 2019a). They break it down as: It's not for me-people who see no need or benefit to be online. I don't have the right support-either to get online or use the device. It's too complicated-people who lack not just the basic digital skills but also an understanding of how the internet works. Older people also highlighted a concern that the internet could take away social interactions (Castle Clarke; Age UK,2015; Olphert and Damodaran. 2013).
Motivation  content media
4
4
17
Simon Schofield
Jun 08, 2022
In General Discussion
Access is probably best considered in terms of availability, affordability and design. The role of place in digital adoption is often overlooked (Williams, 2016; Farrington, 2015; Philip,2016), partularly important with Scotland's rural landscape, where internet usage is lower than in the rest of the UK (Cas, 2018). 18% of adults in the Highlands have never been online and 37% of households in Scotland do not receive broadband speeds of at last 10MB. From the CAS (2018) survey two of the three most common barriers preventing respondents from using the internet were financial. 18% reported that broadband cots were a barrier. 17% reported that people and data costs were a barrier. For those without a computer or internet at home, relying on libraries, or other people such as friends or family creates it's own problems. Timings are particularly relevant for anyone with caring or work commitments (CAS,2018). Having the ability to explore the internet or get comfortable with a computer or device at home can help with the development of digital skills (UWS,2017) Many people access the internet without using a computer, often only through a smartphone, so important that content is suitable for access and use on mobile devices. Design of devices, services and content is also important for digital inclusion. 5% of those not using the internet reported that their disability prevented them from doing so (ONS, 2019). For those with disabilities, or older people, this might mean taking sight or hearing problems, or physical dexterity (difficulties using a mouse or keyboard for example) into consideration (Friemel, 2016) complicated presentation of information, colours, size and layout of text, can be off-putting, or make websites and services unusable (Reform, 2019).
3
0
4
Simon Schofield
Jun 07, 2022
In General Discussion
Technology changes and develops constantly. Many people can feel left behind and so stop engaging with the digital world. Older people for people for example can feel that it's too late in life to start learning, or as they've managed without a computer or internet so far see no reason to start. Citizens Advice (2018) showed the numbers of people-around 60%-unable to complete online forms without assistance. The ONS report (2019) shows almost double the percentage of respondents with disabilities identified a lack of skills or knowledge as a reason compared to those without (15%). Security or privacy concerns were also given as reasons for non-use. A Carnegie UK Trust study (2015) highlighted specific concerns such as privacy, confusion about different options, and worries about spam and viruses.
Skills  content media
4
4
15
Simon Schofield
Jun 01, 2022
In General Discussion
The increasing use of the internet for accessing key services-such as banking, government and council services-has implications for those who are not equipped, unable or unwilling to use them. Digital exclusion (including a lack of increasingly so as more move online by default. Citizens Advice Scotland survey (2018) showed respondents unable to download or save online documents without help, or only able to access the internet through their phone, making completion of forms online very difficult. One example from the sheriff Court showed a claim from with eleven pages even before any information is entered by the user, with fairly large sections of text required to explain the case circumstances.
Accessing Key Services  content media
3
0
5
Simon Schofield
May 31, 2022
In General Discussion
The Number of adults who have either never used the internet or have not used it in the last three months, described as "internet non-users", has been declining over recent years (ONS,2019) but there has been a slowing in the rate of progress in people moving online and gaining basic skills. There are 15.2 million people in the uk who are either non-users, or limited users of the internet (good things Foundation, 2017). A report from citizens Advice Scotland (2018) found almost one in five respondents (18%) reported that they never use the internet. In 2018, 8% of people in the uk (4.3 million people) were estimated to have zero basic skills (i.e. are unable to do any of the activities described here). A further 12% (6.4 million adults) were estimated to only have limited abilities online (missing at last one of the basic digital skills) (ons,2019). Research from good things foundation and CEBR suggests that at current rates, 6.9 million people will still lack digital skills by 2028 (good things foundation, 2019b).
The Scale of Digital exclusion  content media
4
6
17
Simon Schofield
May 25, 2022
In General Discussion
some groups are particularly affected, with a concentration of certain demographics within the digitally excluded The socially isolated tend to have more limited access to, and use of, the internet, devices and online services. The economically disadvantaged also have limited access but are more likely to try and seek out access in place like libraries. those who fall under both categories suffer most disadvantage and have little or no use at all. studies show that overall non-users are increasingly older, less educated, more likely to be unemployed, disabled, and socially isolated. Ipsos MORI identified employment status, educational qualification, and age as strong predictors of weather or not a household has internet access. It is worth noting that all groups are not homogeneous and there can be differences within populations. It's also important to take into account changing trends over time. People digitally disengaged in the past are different from those now, so approaches to tacking it must be adaptable. Older people have consistently made up the largest proportion of internet non-users, and pattern of internet use by age is replicated when looking at digital skills. A survey from citizens Advice Scotland 2018, showed that of respondents aged between 65 and 79 years: Only 25% used the internet often 46% never used the internet 18% have difficulty using a computer 16% cannot use one at all
Which groups are affected  content media
4
1
9
Simon Schofield
May 18, 2022
In General Discussion
These figures suggest we need to build a better understanding of the relationship between social exclusion and digital technology. There are a number of views here. Digital participation can be a way to mitigate social exclusion by introducing disadvantaged groups access to the benefits of internet use (helsper and galacz 2009). Others suggest that offline social inequalities will translate into online social inequalities (Carnegie UK Trust, 2016B: Onoa, 2007). For example, access, design and implementation are often not considered from the perspective of those excluded, and so reproduce existing barriers and inequalities (Jaeger, 2012; Goggin and Newell 2007; Dobransky and Hargittai, 2006) some have argued these structural trends are creating an entrenched digital underclass (Helsper and Reisdorf, 2016 Age UK, 2013; choi and DiNitto, but identifying causality is difficult given how intertwined society and technology now is. Few studies have shown a change in individuals' social inclusion through a sustained engagement with information and communications technology (carnegie UK trust 2016b
Social Exclusion  content media
3
3
12
Simon Schofield
May 10, 2022
In General Discussion
The Definition of digital exclusion has changed over the years, from a simple 'user/non-user to exploring different levels of internet use and skills divisions it has also grown to look at more than just internet use. Broad defined, digital exclusion is where a section of the population have continuing unequal access and capacity to use information and communications technologies (ict) that are essential to fully participate in society. Digital inclusion is about working with communities to address issues of opportunity, access, knowledge and skill in relation to using technology, and in particular, the internet. Many different terms are used interchangeably-digital inclusion, digital participation, digital capability, digital literacy-but essentially it's about people being able to use digital technologies, particularly the internet, in ways that enhance their lives and contribute to helping them overcome other disadvantages which they might face. Helsper 2012 identifies steps of digital engagement, ranging from basic use involving communication, intermediate use involving networking, and advanced use involving civic participation. Digital literacy must be looked at as part of inclusion. Users of the internet can still be digitally excluded because they lack the skills to be able to navigate the digital world.
Definitions of Digital Exclusion  content media
4
4
22
Simon Schofield
May 04, 2022
In General Discussion
The internet and digital technology is very much at the heart now of how public, economic and social life functions. It has transformed how we work, communicate, consume, learn, entertain and access information and public services. And while it's become integral to all aspects of life, the spread of access and use is uneven and use is uneven and many people remain digitally excluded those who are ere excluded can be limited or unable to participate fully in society. The risk is that the divide between those with digital skills, and those who struggle to overcome barriers to access and use, the growing social and economic gap between those who are not continues to widen. How much and how often you use the internet can offer an insight into who could be considered digitally excluded, providing a way to assess how the internet and digital skills impacts on people lives.
The Internet and Disabled People  content media
4
6
16
Simon Schofield
May 03, 2022
In General Discussion
Individuals with learning Disabilities may utilize several tools for broader access to digital resources. Its important for these to be compatible, so as not to restricted access. Abbreviation Expanders Abbreviation expenders are programs that automatically complete a word when the user enters a present code or abbreviation. This can enable learning disabled students to type faster with fewer spelling mistakes. Alternative Keyboards Alternative keyboards are a customizable option that users can program to better meet their needs. For those with learning disabilities, this may include adding graphics, grouping keys by color, and/or limiting input selections. Password Managers Individuals with learning disabilities may struggle to memorize passwords, so password mangers may be essential to maintain access to password-protected sites. Proofreading Programs Proofreading programs are widely used, but at their core, are a type of assistive technology. Spell checkers, grammar checkers, and other proofreading tools are valuable to help individuals with learning disabilities write more clearly and easily. Screen Readers Screen readers read screen text aloud, which may be beneficial for users with reading difficulties. Speech Recognition Programs. Individuals who have stronger verbal than writing skills may use a speech recognition program to transcribe dialogue through a microphone while the computer writes what they say. Touchscreen Due to their intuitive nature, devices with touchscreen capabilities may be easier for individuals with learning disabilities to master instead of traditional computers. Word Prediction software Prediction technology anticipates the word the user is typing based on context, frequency, and syntax. Not only can this save keystrokes, but may also help those who struggle with spelling and/or grammar improve their accuracy.
What Resources Can Help Improve Digital Inclusion And Accessibility For Users With Learning Disabilities  content media
4
7
16
Simon Schofield
Apr 27, 2022
In General Discussion
Users with learning disabilities may use assistive technology, including browser add-ons and extensions. All of your content should work with these tools, support a personalized interface, and allow for simplification. Users should also be able to control when content changes. Besides following the best practices outlined in the WCAG standards, Davies shares several other "useful things to remember and easy gotchas." "The easiest way to make tools more accessible is by using colours with enough contrast," she advisers. "Avoiding using red and green to highlight pass/fail, look at ways to other colours or find other ways to highlight this." "Check your application works with a screen reader," adds Davies. "can people still learn and know what's going on without being able to see the page?" The British Dyslexia Association also recommends certain style guidelines to make web pages and other printed material more accessible for individuals with dyslexia. Suggestions include Front .use: sans serifs fronts, like Arial and Verdana 12-14 point front Character spacing around 35 percent of the letter width Word spacing at least 3.5 times character spacing Line spacing proportional to word spacing; 1.5 is usually best. Avoid: text in all uppercase letters and/ or small caps Underlining Italics Headings and Formatting Use: Front size 20 percent or more greater than normal text Extra space around headings Formatting tools for indents, lists, text alignment, etc. Hyperlinks that look different than other text Color Use: one background color Dark text A light background Contrast between text and background Avoid: Background patterns and pictures A white background Red, pink, and green (for colour blind users) Layout Use: Left-aligned text Lines under 70 characters White space around text Table of contents Regular section headings Avoid: text justification Columns Lines with too many characters Writing Style Use: Active voice Concise wording Simple sentences Images interspersed for support Bullet points and numbering Clear instructions Glossary of abbreviations and special terms Avoid: Double negatives Abbreviations
Support adaptation and personalization  content media
3
1
10